Practical manual of diseases of women and uterine therapeutics for students and practitioners

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W. Wood, 1905 - 1044 pages
 

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Page 195 - I have learned to unlearn the idea — and this was the hardest task of all — that uterine symptoms are not always present in cases of uterine disease, or that, when present, they necessarily come from the uterine disease. The nerves are mighty mimics, the greatest of mimics, and cheat us by their realistic personations of organic disease, and especially of uterine disease.
Page 651 - ... cured ; and for which, even in this age, when science and art boast of such high attainments, no remedy, either medical or surgical, has been tried with a single success. From the middle of the eleventh century, when Albucasis described the first known case of extra-uterine pregnancy, men have doubtless watched the life ebb rapidly from the pale victim of this accident as the torrent of blood is poured into the abdominal cavity, but have never raised a hand to help her.
Page 195 - Let her consult a physician, and he, especially if she has backache, bearing-down feelings, an irritable bladder, and pain in the ovaries, will assert the same thing, and will diligently hunt for some uterine lesion. If one be found, no matter how trifling, he will attach to it undue importance, and treat it heroically as the erring organ. If no visible or tangible disease of the sexual organs be discoverable, he will lay the blame on the invisible endometrium, or on the unseeable ovaries, and continue...
Page 211 - ... resting on the bladder. The mistake made is in attributing to this natural position of the womb the various forms of pelvic trouble, especially that of irritability of the bladder to which women are so liable. But the...
Page 195 - ... diligently hunt for some uterine lesion. If one be found, no matter how trifling, he will attach to it undue importance, and treat it heroically as the erring organ. If no visible or tangible disease of the sexual organs be discoverable, he will lay the blame on the invisible endometrium, or on the unseeable ovaries, and continue the local treatment. In any event, whatever the inlook or the outlook, a local treatment more or less severe, is bound to be the issue.
Page 201 - Where in an insane person ovulation and its external manifestation, the menstrual discharge, are absent or erratic, the erraticism or absence may be a consequence of the general and insane condition, and not a causal factor in its production ; but under any circumstances such abnormal menstruation appears to have an aggravating effect on the insanity, and there is sufficient evidence to strengthen the belief that when such irregularity — especially if it be due to a pathological cause— exists,...
Page 651 - But here is an accident which may happen to any wife in the most useful period of her existence, which good authorities have said is never cured ; and for which, even in this age, when science and art boast of such high attainments, no remedy, either medical or surgical, has been tried with a single success.
Page 202 - America, it does not appear that there is in healthfully minded women, who suffer from diseases of the genitalia, any special risk of post-operative insanity. On the other hand, if there be a psychopathic predisposition, which...
Page 219 - ... and the uterus is drawn slightly downwards to straighten the bend as far as possible. A sound is passed to determine the exact direction of the canal, which is then thoroughly dilated, preferably with a Goodell's dilator. This is followed by curetting, a large quantity of fungosities being usually removed. The operator then takes the tenaculum in the left hand and with knee-bent scissors in the right cuts through the whole thickness of the posterior lip of the cervix almost to the vaginal mucous...
Page 82 - ... to walk the bladder sinks more into the pelvis though even then its attachments are so loose that it readily rises wholly into the abdominal cavity when distended or otherwise displaced, a feature observed until puberty is near at hand. The uterus in the child is almost entirely made up of cervix, there being very little body, and it lies in the upper part of the pelvis. At birth the ovaries have descended as far as the brim of the true pelvis, but in children a few weeks old they are found close...

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