Theories of Comparative Politics: The Search for a Paradigm Reconsidered

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Westview Press, 1994 - Political Science - 417 pages
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Extensively revised and updated, this classic text revisits the central problem of searching for mainstream and alternative paradigms to guide us in comparative political inquiry. Building upon the first edition’s comprehensive and systematic overview of frameworks, ideologies, and theories, the second edition highlights new directions and developments over the past decade, including the continuation of an ideological political science; methodological innovations such as rational-choice, historical, and postbehavioral approaches; new emphases on and links between political culture and participation; the recasting of modernization theory and the revitalization of class analysis; and a thoroughgoing post-Keynesian political economy point of view.The second edition continues the tradition of the first in updating what one reviewer commended as “outstanding… excellent annotated bibliographies at the end of each chapter and the thorough survey of the general literature of comparative politics at the end of the book.” In addition, the new edition includes an appendix of definitions that facilitate clarity and understanding of political science terminology, important for students at every level from the introductory on up.In a post–Cold War world in which challenges to comparative inquiry abound—ethnic conflict, authoritarian repression, state building and disintegration, new industrialization and postindustrialization, security systems redefined—the search for new paradigms that Theories of Comparative Politics represents gains in importance daily.

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Comparative Inquiry
Ideology and Issues of Comparative Politics
Politics and the Science of Politics in Comparative Inquiry
Marx and Weber as Precursors
An inventory of ideas
Theories of System and State
Individual and Movement
From Pluralist Elite to RuMng Class and Mass
Relationship of Base and Superstructure
Political Economy and a Reconstitution
The NeoMarxists
Comparative Political Economy and Theories of State
Notes on Comparative Terminology
Methods and Inquiry

Theories of Development and Underdevelopment
Definitions of Dependency
About the Book and Author

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Page 97 - The sum total of these relations of production constitutes the economic structure of society — the real foundation, on which rises a legal and political superstructure and to which correspond definite forms of social consciousness.
Page 109 - The ideas of the ruling class are in every epoch the ruling ideas, ie the class which is the ruling material force of society, is at the same time its ruling intellectual force.
Page 345 - At a certain stage of their development, the material forces of production in society come in conflict with the existing relations of production...
Page 345 - No social order ever disappears before all the productive forces for which there is room in it have been developed; and new higher relations of production never appear before the material conditions of their existence have matured in the womb of the old society itself.
Page 109 - The lower strata of the middle class — the small tradespeople, shopkeepers, and retired tradesmen generally, the handicraftsmen and peasants — all these sink gradually into the proletariat, partly because their diminutive capital does not suffice for the scale on which modern industry is carried on, and is swamped in the competition with the large capitalists, partly because their specialized skill is rendered worthless by new methods of production. Thus the proletariat is recruited from all...
Page 109 - Constant revolutionizing of production, uninterrupted disturbance of all social conditions, everlasting uncertainty and agitation distinguish the bourgeois epoch from all earlier ones. All fixed, fast-frozen relations, with their train of ancient and venerable prejudices and opinions, are swept away, all new-formed ones become antiquated before they can ossify. All that is solid melts into air...
Page 109 - The bourgeoisie cannot exist without constantly revolutionizing the instruments of production, and thereby the relations of production, and with them the whole relations of society.
Page 289 - In all societies — from societies that are very meagerly developed and have barely attained the dawnings of civilization, down to the most advanced and powerful societies — two classes of people appear — a class that rules and a class that is ruled.
Page 97 - In considering such transformations a distinction should always be made between the material transformation of the economic conditions of production which can be determined with the precision of natural science, and the legal, political, religious, aesthetic, or philosophic — in short, ideological — forms in which men become conscious of this conflict and fight it out.
Page 97 - No social order is ever destroyed before all the productive forces for which it is sufficient have been developed, and new superior relations of production never replace older ones before the material conditions for their existence have matured within the framework of the old society.

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About the author (1994)

Ronald H. Chilcote is professor of political science and economics at the University of California, Riverside. He is founder and managing editor of Latin American Perspectives and author and editor of numerous books and articles, including Theories of Development and Underdevelopment.

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